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Protein Shakes and Shakeology: Are You Protein Deficient? Today's culture has trained us to naturally think that a protein shake is going to help us lose weight, build muscle and be the underlying answer to our prayers in our fitness journeys. I mean, it makes sense, right?

~ Protein builds muscle.

~ Muscle burns fat.

So -- a protein shake should be the obvious remedy.

And, because Shakeology has soooo many benefits, it MUST be a protein shake, too. Right?

WRONG!

Protein shakes seay stanford
Protein shakes seay stanford

When someone asks me about how to incorporate protein shakes or bars into their diets I ask them, "Why do you want to do that? Are you protein deficient?"

This question usually gets me a blank stare or several moments of silence over the telephone. Then they ask, "But, Shakeology is a protein shake...and it will help me lose weight. Right?"

The world of fitness can be so confusing and I want to clear up the basics about protein shakes. While they may be instrumental if you're focusing on a short-term goal to build lean muscle mass, they are not the most beneficial choice if you're simply trying to tone up or lose a few pounds.

Protein -- What is It?

Protein consists of amino acids, which are the body's primary building blocks. Without protein, it's impossible for our bodies to create muscles, bones, skin, internal organs, enzymes or other parts. It regulates our fluids and pH levels. You get it naturally from beans, legumes, eggs, dairy and meat sources.

How Much Do I Need

Experts indicate that the "ideal" serving of protein in one sitting is 30 grams, which equals about 4 oz. That's a small chicken breast or two eggs, for example. A person weighing 150 pounds should eat a minimum of 54.5 grams, depending on fitness and activity levels. If your muscle mass is more, you may be able to eat more, because your metabolism runs faster. If you're active, you can eat more. But, if you're sedentary, your amount would be lower than other individuals.

Unused Protein Turns to Fat

Yikes! Is that true? You bet it is: your body can't store protein. So, extra protein that goes unused (due to inactivity or excess intake) will turn to glucose or fat. This is the exact opposite of your intentions.

And, too much protein can be harmful to your body. In excessive cases over long-term time periods, too much protein can damage your kidneys and cause metabolic acidosis (creating an acidic level in your body).

What about Shakeology?

Shakeology is a protein shake. It has a lot of protein sources in it. Its proprietary super protein blend include the following ingredients:

  • Whey
  • Sachi Inchi
  • Chia
  • Flax
  • Quinoa
  • Amranth
  • Brown Rice
  • Pea

BUT -- it has much, much more than that. It includes an entire day's worth of vitamins and nutrients, the equivalent of FIVE plates of salad. (That's a LOT of trips to the salad bar!)

Your Own Deficiencies

Most people are much more nutrient deficient than they are lacking in protein. By not eating balanced diets, we deprive ourselves of certain vitamins and nutrients that are essential to our body's healthy chemistry.

Is a protein shake going to cure that? Of course, not! It's not going to help you incorporate more fresh vegetables or fruits into your diet or eliminate refined carbs. (In fact, many processed protein shakes include sugar or artificial sweeteners in them that are counterproductive to your goals.)

Bottom Line

Do you need a protein shake to lose weight? Absolutely not! (Again, are you protein deficient? I didn't think so!)

What do you need to do? Eat a balanced diet that includes lean proteins and simple carbs and exercise regularly. I can help you with that!

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